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G-20 Convenes Amid Economic Gloom – Foreign Policy – Foreign Policy

But the group of nations remains deeply fractured over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.
Beijing has become dangerously locked off from the world.
New survey data shows a majority of Ukrainians do not support the travel ban in its current form.
A recent peace deal could bring critical humanitarian relief after nearly two years of war.
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Welcome to today’s Morning Brief, where we’re looking at the G-20 summit, detained British-Egyptian activist Alaa Abd el-Fattah ends his water strike, and Iran’s attacks Kurdish groups.
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G-20 Leaders Meet for Annual Summit 
Welcome to today’s Morning Brief, where we’re looking at the G-20 summit, detained British-Egyptian activist Alaa Abd el-Fattah ends his water strike, and Iran’s attacks Kurdish groups.
If you would like to receive Morning Brief in your inbox every weekday, please sign up here.
G-20 Leaders Meet for Annual Summit 
Leaders representing the G-20 nations will meet in Bali, Indonesia today for an annual summit as Russia’s invasion of Ukraine sends shockwaves around the world and forces countries to confront a troubling economic outlook.
It’s a problem that isn’t going away anytime soon, with the International Monetary Fund warning of more economic “storm clouds.” “This year’s shocks will re-open economic wounds that were only partially healed post-pandemic,” it said. “In short, the worst is yet to come and, for many people, 2023 will feel like a recession.”
But it’s unlikely that this summit will result in any sort of collective response to these challenges, especially as the group of nations remains deeply fractured over Moscow’s war effort. Ahead of the meeting, European leaders have suggested that it may not even culminate in a joint statement, the Washington Post reported.
The G-20 includes 19 nations and the European Union. Most leaders will be in Bali, but Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and Russian President Vladimir Putin are not attending. Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov will be standing in for Putin, although reports circulated on Monday that Lavrov had been hospitalized before the summit began; he has refuted the report.
A spate of diplomatic meetings are set to take place on the sidelines of the summit, although the most closely-watched one already occurred on Monday: U.S. President Joe Biden’s three hour-long in-person talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping. 
After the meeting, China named Taiwan as a “red line,” while Biden said he did not think Beijing had  imminent plans to invade the island. 
“I absolutely believe there need not be a new Cold War,” he said. “I have met many times with Xi Jinping and we were candid and clear with one another across the board. I do not think there is any imminent attempt on the part of China to invade Taiwan.”
On Monday, White House officials also announced that U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken will travel to China next year to continue discussions. 
What We’re Following Today
Egypt’s imprisoned activist. Alaa Abd el-Fattah, the detained British-Egyptian activist who began a water strike on Nov. 6, is alive and has started drinking water, his family said on Monday. Before refusing water, Abd el-Fattah had also been on a hunger strike since April. 
Abd el-Fattah’s hunger strike—and his family’s efforts to draw attention to his health—have spotlighted Egypt’s troubling human rights record as it hosts COP27, the latest United Nations climate summit.
Iran attacks Kurdish opposition. At least two people were killed and eight more were injured after Iranian authorities launched a series of strikes targeting Kurdish Iranian groups on Monday. Tehran has accused the parties of orchestrating the anti-government protests that were ignited by the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini while in police custody in September. 
Keep an Eye On

Haiti’s political turmoil. Haiti’s caretaker Prime Minister Ariel Henry has fired the country’s government commissioner, interior minister, and justice minister, the Associated Press reported, as he grapples with rampant gang violence and economic instability. 
It’s not clear why they were dismissed, although last month Washington unveiled visa sanctions against 11 unnamed Haitian officials with gang ties, from both the current administration and earlier ones. 
British-French migrant policy. Britain and France have agreed to a deal designed to limit the number of migrants who can reach Britain by traveling in small boats. In exchange for $74.5 million in British payments, France will significantly ramp up its coastal security, the New York Times reported. 
Monday’s Most Read
Crypto’s Boy King Got Dethroned Overnight by David Gerard
The Obvious Climate Strategy Nobody Will Talk About by Ted Nordhaus, Vijaya Ramachandran, and Patrick Brown
The Barbadian Proposal Turning Heads at COP27 by Catherine Osborn
Odds and Ends 
After pigs brawl, bystander pigs will try to ease tensions by lightly touching one of the fighting pigs with their snouts or ears, according to a new study. That physical contact can help reduce a victim pig’s anxiety—and lower the chances that the instigator will attack others, the Washington Post reported.
“Pigs are highly social, and they have a very complex and high cognitive capacity to recognize familiar individuals,” Giada Cordoni, one of the report’s authors, told the Post.
Christina Lu is a reporter at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @christinafei
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Leaders of the world’s largest economies are gathering in Bali, Indonesia, for the G-20 summit this week. Challenges to address include Russia’s war in Ukraine, unprecedented risks to inShow moreternational energy and food supply chains, and a global economy edging closer to recession. What are the main summit takeaways to stay abreast of? FP editor in chief Ravi Agrawal will host a debrief conversation with Edward Alden, an FP columnist and a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, Lynn Kuok, a senior fellow for Asia-Pacific security at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, and Matthew Kroenig, an FP columnist and the deputy director of the Atlantic Council’s Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security. They will consider the successes and failures of the summit, whether wealthy nations are doing enough to reinvigorate the global economy, and the geopolitical implications of the latest meeting among world leaders.
Though the composition of the U.S. Congress after yesterday’s Midterms is still unclear, trend lines are emerging—and the consequences of the elections will be felt all over the worlShow mored. Will U.S. support for Ukraine continue apace? Will a beleaguered President Biden get tougher on China and Saudi Arabia? And with the Republican Party itself increasingly splintered, will its more isolationist wing win out? Tune in as FP’s executive editor, Amelia Lester, and FP’s team of reporters answer your questions about what’s at stake for U.S. foreign policy in the midterms as well as analyze the possible outcomes. 
The Biden administration is increasingly making clear it is intent on slowing down China’s technological rise. Washington has dramatically expanded controls on technology flowing to and frShow moreom Beijing by imposing aggressive sanctions targeting China’s chip and semiconductor industry. What impact will these changes have on the broader U.S.-China relationship? Will other nations support Washington’s new approach? How will this impact the global economy?  Watch FP editor in chief Ravi Agrawal’s conversation with Jon Bateman, a senior fellow in the Technology and International Affairs Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Bateman previously served as the director for cyber strategy implementation in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Read his essay on U.S.-China decoupling.
A provincial default has destroyed local government credibility.
Beijing has become dangerously locked off from the world.
A recent peace deal could bring critical humanitarian relief after nearly two years of war.
The U.S. president embarks on a weeklong trip on the heels of the midterm elections, aiming to project stability and strength.

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